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Data reports

Maps and reports based on data from The Ancient Tree Hunt database. Find out how you can request specific reports.

The ATH database contains about 113,000 trees and readers can search and view individual tree information or in a list (see Trees & Maps / Tree search and Interactive map).

Request data reports & maps
On request the Ancient Tree Hunt can provide maps similar to the one produced for ash below (data maps for yew and oak are in the pipeline) showing the distribution of ancient, notable and veteran trees across the UK.

The ATH can also, on request, provide the results of the analysis of tree data (as of August 2011) according to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) criteria for assessing hot spots of different value according to the number of ancient, veteran and large diameter trees.

These maps can be supplied at UK, country or county scale and for other designated areas such as AONBs, National Parks or landscape scale projects. Contact: ancienttreeinventory@woodlandtrust.org.uk

PUBLISHED REPORTS

Ancient & veteran oak distribution in the UK - data report
3 April 2013

Important areas of Trees of Special Interest - data report
18 March 2013

The National Trust - Ancient Tree Hunt data partner
6 March 2013 (data February 2013)

Essex ancient tree hotspots
19 February 2013 (data 13 August 2012)

Ancient & veteran yew distribution in the UK
28 January 2013

High Weald ancient tree hotspots
10 December 2012

Ancient & veteran Ash distribution in the UK
5 November 2012

ANCIENT TREE HUNT
mapping the UK's ancient
& special trees

The Ancient Tree Hunt is a living database of ancient and special trees. More than 110,000 trees have been recorded by volunteers and partners.

TREE FOCUS
Highlights from the Ancient Tree Hunt database

The Darley Oak, Cornwall
The Darley Oak, Cornwall

Possibly 1000 years old and still going strong! The Darley Oak, on the edge of Bodmin Moor, has certainly seen some action in its time and has even been a venue for some rather unusual tea parties, as long ago as 1727 – inside a hollow in the trunk! Age began to take its toll and the great canopy section collapsed in the 1980s so the parties had to stop..

This wonderful tree is the subject of much local folklore, too, with special healing properties for various ailments and diseases. Its acorns, of which there were many in the past, were used as good luck charms during pregnancy. Allegedly, wishes will be granted to anyone who passes through the hollow and circles the girth.

View the ATH dynamic maps

Record trees on the ATH database